Affinity Designer for Windows enters beta

Affinity Designer for Windows enters beta

Affinity Designer is professional graphic design software, a tool “built on core principles of performance, stability and lack of bloat”. Serif says “Affinity Designer contains all the tools needed in a professional vector design app, meticulously crafted for professionals.”

Why does graphic design software land on a website dedicated to video? Well, because many times artwork created in graphic software like Adobe Illustrator ends in video productions, so it makes sense to mention – and know about – a new program. A program that, according to some, does compete, in features and speed with Illustrator.

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Affinity Designer is fast, meaning you can pan and zoom at 60fps and see all adjustments, effects, transformations and brushes in real time. It works in any colour space … RGB, CMYK, LAB, greyscale, and offers end-to-end CMYK workflow with ICC colour management and 16-bit per channel editing.

Serif say that “it’s incredibly accurate, allowing you to zoom to over 1 million per cent”. And Affinity Designer has the best PSD import engine available with full support for SVG, EPS, PDF, PDF/X and FH files, which means integrating it into a workflow is painless.

Constantly updated since it launched for Mac, the program has been well received by the market. It was selected as a runner-up in Apple’s “Best of 2014” list of Mac App Store and iTunes Store content in the OS X app category and has won the Apple Design Award 2015.

Affinity Designer for Windows enters beta

Initially presented as a Mac only application, it is also going to be available for Windows, as the other programs from the “suite”: Affinity Photo, expected for Windows by the end of 2016, and a much talked Affinity Publisher, which will launch in 2017 for Mac and Windows. Serif has been bombarded, since day one, with requests from customers wanting a Windows version.

Serif Managing Director Ashley Hewson says: “We know, because they tell us every day, that there’s a massive sense of excitement among Windows users who want the same professional design tools that our Mac apps deliver.

“The beta launch of Affinity Designer on Windows is a huge step towards that, although it’s important to remember that it’s not the finished product at this stage. Our beta phase for Mac was exceptionally valuable in helping us to refine the software and now we’re excited to work just as a closely with Windows users, to deliver a brilliant end product.”

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The beta version of Affinity Designer for Windows has the number 1.5, what is somehow interesting, as it takes the same number as an update for the Mac version, announced recently, and that introduces a series of powerful new features. These new features are also present in the beta version of Windows.

Version 1.5 introduces the Constraints feature – the ability to control the position or size of an object relative to its container, making it possible to create reusable elements which perform in a pseudo-responsive fashion. Ashley Hewson says: “This is something we think is pretty unique to Affinity Designer. We’re super-excited to get it out to users.”

Meanwhile the Symbols feature will allow users to have multiple instances of the same object, where editing one object will edit them all simultaneously. Ashley Hewson adds: “These fast, powerful updates will be particularly useful for people working on user interface design and website mock-ups.”

Version 1.5 of Affinity Designer for Mac – winner of an Apple Design Award in 2015 – will be released in beta later this month, with the full version available for download through the App Store in August. There will be no charge for existing Affinity Designer owners.

If you want to try the beta version for Windows, go to Affinity’s website, register and you’ll get a download link. You’ll need to be running 64 bit Windows 7 and above to use the beta.

The first full version of Affinity Designer for Windows is likely to go on sale in around three months, for direct download from the Affinity website. Customers will pay only an initial price of $49.99 / GBP39.99 / EUR49.99 for the software and subsequent updates – there’s no ongoing subscription.

SanDisk CFast corrupts EOS-1D X Mk II photos

SanDisk CFast corrupts EOS-1D X Mk II photos

Canon suggests customers to refrain from using SanDisk CFast cards when shooting still images, as files, both in RAW or JPEG formats, will be corrupted. A firmware update will be available in July.

According to Canon, if a SanDisk CFast card is inserted into the camera or a card reader, the bottom part of still images recorded may be corrupted. This phenomenon is confirmed in images recorded in both the RAW and JPEG formats. In the RAW file, the image corruption may appear in the bottom right corner of the image. In the JPEG file, the image corruption may appear in the lower third area of the image.

The information from Canon indicates that movie recording is not affected by this phenomenon, neither are still images or movies recorded to CF cards. The company adds that the problem is caused by SanDisk Cfast cards and provided a list of affected products:

SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxx)
SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxx)
SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxxA)
SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxxA)
SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 64GB (SDCFSP-064G-xxxB)
SanDisk Extreme PRO CFast2.0 128GB (SDCFSP-128G-xxxB)

The “xxx” at the end of the product number varies depending on the sales region.

The EOS-1D X Mark II is Canon’s first digital SLR to accept CFast type memory cards. Based on the Serial ATA Gen III interface, CFast 2.0 cards offer significantly faster potential speeds when writing to the card — an important factor in a camera’s shooting performance, and one reason for Canon to use them in this model.

Canon will release camera firmware that solves the problem early July, but until then asks customers to refrain from using SanDisk CFast cards when shooting still images. For those that must use the camera with these cards, Canon indicates a workaround and ways to prevent the phenomenon. All the information is available on Canon’s website.

Have a voice in the future of RAW

Have a voice in the future of RAW

The first version of ON1 Photo RAW, which will launch in the Fall, is mostly defined, but ON1 aims to take the program further. To do that they want customers to be a part of what the company is building. They ask users to have a voice in the future of RAW photo editing.

ON1 Photo RAW wants to be the “the world’s fastest, most flexible, and easiest to use raw processor and photo editors available”. That’s how it started, but now ON1 aims higher and wants the community to take part on the definition of what is the best RAW editor in the market.

Patrick Smith, Director of Marketing, says he is “excited to share something Dan Harlacher, ON1 Director of Product Management, and I’ve been working on for the past several weeks: the Photo RAW Project”. He adds that “everyone here at ON1 wants the world’s fastest, most flexible, and easiest to use raw processor and photo editor. We are off to a great start with the first release coming this fall and immediately want to get working on the future. This time, we want ON1 customers, followers, industry writers, and fans to have a say in what’s most important to them when it comes to a raw processor. This project will be ongoing and covers both current and future releases of ON1 Photo RAW.”

Have a voice in the future of RAW

The experience ON1 has with the community built around their actual programs has helped to take this new step, one that will give users a voice on the development of the program. Patrick Smith says that “the Photo RAW Project is a unique opportunity for everyone to be a part of what we’re building today and in the future. Your ideas will help and inspire us to deliver the best raw processor, photo editor, and plug-in available. We want to continue to build what’s most important and continue product innovation.”

ON1 invites users to use their website to share their thoughts. The project team will review the ideas most voted, which the community will then discuss. The first suggestions published show that many users want to have a program that mixes parts of every other editor, from Aperture to Photoshop. Others want the program to work stand-alone but also with Lightroom or Photoshop. It’s wise for the project team to have left a note on the website stating that “we can’t put every good idea into development, but we’ll try!” because I feel a lot of what is asked will be difficult to put in place.

One aspect I looked for was the treatment of video, and from the support the suggestions have, I guess we are not going to see many tools – if any – for video in ON1 Photo Editor. One of the requests was for color grading video, with a suggestion – “It would be nice to color grade video, even 4k. Then stills and video would be ready in the same workflow”. This is something I’ve asked to ON1 before, because their actual software offers so many predefined “color grading” option for stills. It really would be nice to be able to use some of them in video.

Last Call: Digital Bolex D16 to be Discontinued

A blog post from Elle Schneider on the Digital Bolex site reveals the sad news: after 30 June 2016 at 11:59 PM PST (that’s this Thursday night, folks), the D16 digital cine camera will no longer be sold. The website and support functions will continue, but the camera itself will no longer be available.

Digital Bolex D16 cameras
Digital Bolex D16 cameras

No details were provided behind the decision to discontinue the D16, though the blog posting offers a number of hypothetical contributing factors. There’s a live UStream hangout at noon PDT on June 30th during which more information may become available.

The camera has an enthusiastic following among those who know it; its unusual design is surprisingly pleasant to use, and its color rendering is sublime.

I shot a video interview with Digital Bolex’s Joe Rubinstein at NAB 2014.

Joe Rubinstein shows off D16 footage at the NAB 2014 CML gathering
Joe Rubinstein shows off D16 footage at the NAB 2014 CML gathering
The D16's skintone rendering is really quite nice.
The D16’s skintone rendering is really quite nice
Carlos Acosta of Solid Camera wields a D16 while Jim Mathers of the Digital Cinema Society looks on
Carlos Acosta of Solid Camera wields a D16 while Jim Mathers of the Digital Cinema Society looks on

Keep an eye on the Digital Bolex website for more info, and if you were on the fence about getting one, this is your last chance for a brand-new one.

Last call, ladies and gents, the bar is about to close…

Impression 2: the democratic art tool

Topaz Impression 2: the democratic art tool

Topaz Impression 2 aims to relate its users to names as Monet, Van Gogh, and Cezanne, by giving them the tools to create different expressions of their photographs. But is it the aim of every photographer to be a painter?

Don’t get me wrong. I love what Topaz Labs Impression 2 does. The program can paint over 10,000 brushstrokes in less than a second. I am sure Monet, Van Gogh, Cezanne and all the others would envy me if they had a chance to see me working on my photographs. But Topaz sells the idea that Impression 2, “helps make your photos more expressive by authentically turning them into art, the way a real painter would: painting brushstrokes one at a time.”

Topaz Impression 2: the democratic art tool

Well, this contradicts the info given: that the program can paint over 10,000 brushstrokes in less than a second. Furthermore, it suggests that if painters could do it the same way, they would not do it as Topaz Labs says they did to create art: painting brushstrokes one at a time. I know it gets confusing here, but I wanted to mention this, as I think it is crucial: you’re not painting as the masters, you’re using an automatic program and do not have the same degree of control they had. But you do have an easier task. Let me add one more note here: I think that one of the worst comments photographers get about their work is: “it looks like a painting”.

I do not think Impression 2 needs to be sold supported by the idea that it transforms your photographs into paintings, or works of art or whatever some people want to call them. I do believe, though, that the program opens an immense playground of possibilities, and that it should be explored with that in mind. Yes, it does transform your photos – or whatever image you feed it – into something else, from a collection of 143 curated pre-made effects covering every imaginable technique. Furthermore, it allows you to edit these effects and create your own, meaning you can express yourself in infinite ways. That’s, I believe, one of the most interesting aspects of the program.

Topaz Impression 2: the democratic art tool

Do you want to transform all your photographs into something else? I know I don’t. But that does not mean I do not want to create something new using some of my photographs as the starting point. In that sense, Impression 2 is a democratic art tool, because it allows people that otherwise would not be able to paint like Monet, Van Gogh or Cezanne, draw like DaVinci or the cavemen from ancient times to give it a try, even if through a computer program. Maybe they discover a passion that may lead them to take drawing or painting classes.

Completely redesigned, Impression 2 is both a plugin to popular editors like Photoshop and Lightroom and a standalone program. This is something that Topaz Labs has introduced in their recent programs. Impression 2 is, I believe, a fantastic tool that has its uses, also in professional work. Videographers looking for ways to transform static images for their videos may want to include Impression 2 in their workflow.

Topaz Impression 2: the democratic art tool
Impression 2 offers a new interface, more options, including complete control of masks, luminosity, color and more

One example of the potential of Impression 2 is given by the work of fine art photographer Bonnie Al-Rifai. She uses Topaz Impression 2 to help her developing a deep 20-image visual story about the town of Happy, TX. On Topaz Labs’ website the artist says that “Most of my images are about storytelling, joy, and heartache. I like to add a painted look to bridge the gap between real and surreal. Adding that extra pop with one of Impression’s painting effects completes my vision. Impression is so exciting to me because now I can blend the real with the unreal without actually having to go take art classes to learn how to paint.”

Topaz Impression 2 is a step above Topaz Labs Simplify, a program mentioned here at ProVideo Coalition in February 2014. What I wrote then about Simplify is valid for Impression 2: don’t use the program as a crutch to transform uninteresting photographs into works of art. Pick some of your most interesting photos and explore what other visions you can build around them. That’s the real value of Topaz Impression 2!

The program costs $99.99 but until July 7th it is available for $59,99 with coupon code 2IMPRESS.

A digest of last week’s photo and video news – Week 26

A digest of last week's photo and video news - Week 26

A digest of last week’s news is a selection of some of the news from week 25 from 2016. The digest covers multiple topics related to photography and video. Hasselblad, Drobo, Western Digital and Dell are a choice of news from last week.

Drobo 5D Turbo for power users

A digest of last week's photo and video news - Week 26

Drobo announced the new 5D Turbo, designed for professionals and media creators, providing them with simplicity, flexibility and performance. The new 5 bay DAS uses Drobo’s patented BeyondRAID technology. It offers both High Speed Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3.0, providing the ultimate in flexibility. The 5D Turbo is, according to Drobo, a complete solution that also supports 4k Thunderbolt connected displays. Included with the 5Dt is an mSATA card for increased performance, Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3.0 cables and DroboCare for 3 years at no additional charge. The Drobo 5Dt is available at $899.


Dell UltraSharp UP3017

A digest of last week's photo and video news - Week 26

A new monitor from Dell is on its way. The UltraSharp UP3017 is a 30?display, offering high-quality color space for every creative professionals. With a factory calibration report and a Delta-E > 2, the monitor offers, according to Dell, “wide color coverage, as major industry standards such as AdobeRGB, sRGB, REC709 and DCI-P3 are 99% covered. Users can also fine-tune the monitor through a Custom Color mode, SDK and optional X-rite i1Display Pro colorimeter. With a resolution of 2560 x 1600, the monitor includes advanced connectivity (DP-out) for simple daisy chain extension into a second screen, and allows for easy display of content from two PC sources with picture-by-picture and picture-in-picture features. The price at Dell’s store is $1,399.99.


WD: New Passport and Cloud

A digest of last week's photo and video news - Week 26

Western Digital introduced the WD Pro Series: My Passport Wireless Pro Wi-Fi mobile storage and My Cloud Pro Series network attached storage (NAS). Designed specifically for the creative community, the WD Pro Series enables seamless transfer of content between devices, regardless of whether users are on a remote shoot, in the studio or editing at home. The My Passport Wireless Pro device is available in capacities up to 3TB, while the My Cloud Pro Series NAS drives offers up to 32TB storage. For price and configurations visit the WD store.


Hasselblad: no 4K, we’re afraid

Hasselblad X1D as a video machine

Although the info available indicates that the new Hasselblad XD1 only does FullHD, the Swedish company was asked about the viability of 4K. Hasselblad’s team says that “the particular 50MP CMOS sensor is physically not capable of delivering 4K video. Also, X1D is fully optimised for still image photography. But who knows, hopefully the next generation of X System will deliver 4K in future!” So, now you know that 4K may be in future Hasselblad models.


A guide to macro photography

A digest of last week's photo and video news - Week 26

The Complete Guide to Macro and Close-Up Photography by author Cyrill Harnischmacher offers insights about macro photo composition, discussing light, color, camera position, and focus. With more than 600 images and figures, the book illustrates the various ways to document the world of macro. The book also includes do-it-yourself projects. The publisher, Rocky Nook, has a special offer until July 1: use coupon code MACROEBOOK to buy the eBook for $15, coupon code MACROPRINT to buy the print edition for $20 or MACROBUNDLE to get both eBook and book for $35.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

The new Ikea Ladda batteries are a good choice if you use batteries for your flashes, LED panels, flash triggers and other devices. I discovered them recently and decided to buy two packs of 4. After using them on my flashes for some days, I see no real difference from the Powerex Imedion I use. So I am investing in a few more packs because batteries are something I use a lot.

With a price of $6.99 for each pack of 4 AA type batteries, the new batteries from IKEA are a real bargain. A pack of 4 AA Ni-MH, 2000mAh Panasonic Eneloop costs somewhere around $14.99. The Ikea Ladda, which are LSD Ni-MH (Low Self-Discharge nickel-metal hydride), offer 2450mAh.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

Eneloops are rechargeable up to 2100 times while the new Ikea Ladda only accept up to 500 charges. This may explain the difference in price. Or it may not, as some people who tested the batteries say that they’re rebranded Eneloops Pro. Eneloop Pro batteries have a capacity of 2550mAh, are rechargeable up to 500 times and each pack of 4 costs $36.10. People in different forums online suggest the Ikea LADDA are Eneloop Pro. Physical characteristics, charge and discharge cycles point in that direction, they say. Even if they are not, the difference in price suggests which direction many people will go. I included!

There is another aspect to consider: the Ikea batteries are “made in Japan”, where there is only one manufacturer of LSD batteries: FDK. Does it mean that different brands in the market – Amazon Basics, Black Fujitsu, Eneloops Pro and “IKEAloops” as some call them – all come from the same place? Ikea now offers two capacities in AA batteries: 2450mAh and 900mAh, both sold at the same price.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

Although I did not test the new batteries, I used them with my flashes, as I do with my Imedion batteries, and saw no difference. I use Powerex Imedion AA 2400mAh which cost $12.91 per 4-Pack along with some old GP Recyko AA 2100mAh. I used Sony CycleEnergy and Eneloops before, but had problems with both brands (like leaking Eneloops, probably those Panasonic makes in China), so stopped using them altogether.

When I first bought the IKEA batteries I thought to use them on devices like remote flash triggers, that don’t need as much power as flashes. Now that I tried them with my flashes, I guess I will use them as my Powerex Imedion, which cost almost double. The Ikea Ladda batteries are quite new in the market, told me a sales assistant at the Ikea I visited. On the same visit, I bought a battery charger that works as expected and allows to charge 12 batteries, AA or AAA.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

The Storhogen battery charger with storage costs $34.99 and offers 12 separate charging channels. That makes it possible to charge up to 12 rechargeable batteries at the same time, and to mix AA and AAA batteries. In terms of design, this is not a professional looking charger. It looks like a book, especially when closed, and the marketing does suggest it can be placed in a bookshelf or on a table. This is a slow charger, so if you need to charge your batteries rapidly, you need to look elsewhere. Rechargeable batteries, though, will have a longer life cycle when charged slowly, so this is a good solution to have home.

My regular charger for batteries is the Powerex MH-C800S 8-Cell Smart Charger for AA / AAA NiMH / NiCD batteries. It charges up to eight AA or AAA nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) or nickel-cadmium (NiCD) batteries in approximately 1-2 hr. The charger has eight independent charging circuits capable of charging 1-8 batteries in any combination. A large LCD screen shows the charging status of each battery. You have a choice of rapid and soft charge modes. Rapid charge enables eight batteries to be fully charged to their maximum capacities in 1-2 hr. Soft charge takes about 3-4 hr but provides greater battery life, as well as compatibility with older, lower-capacity batteries.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

The Powerex MH-C800S has an integrated deep conditioning system which charges, deep-discharges and then recharges batteries automatically, in order to offer maximum rejuvenation. The eighth generation MH-NM7008 Powerex Precision Microprocessor ensures batteries are charged to their maximum capacities without being over- or undercharged. It affords maximum battery longevity, delivering just the right amount of charge every time. All this for $39.95.

Looking at the specifications, the Powerex MH-C800S is, no doubt, the best solution. But the Storhogen charger from Ikea allows me to charge 12 batteries at once, and that makes sense to me. Furthermore, it charges batteries individually and offers safety of operation through a separate safety timer and temperature sensor. After fully charge batteries, charger will go into trickle charging, enables batteries to be stored in the charger. The LCD display indicates charging status and also damaged or non-rechargeable batteries.

Are Ikea batteries Eneloops in disguise?

With the Powerex MH-C800S used to charge, test and condition batteries and the Storhogen to recharge batteries, I’ve the capacity to recharge many batteries at a time. I am also curious to see how the Ladda batteries perform after a few charges. Brand new batteries need 2 to 3 times of charging and usage cycles to optimize the battery performance. From what I read online, the charge capacity of these “Ikealoops” improves with use, so it will only get better. Not bad for some $6.99 batteries from Ikea. Are these Eneloops? Who cares, if the price is good and they work!

One final note: Ikea has other rechargeable batteries and a small charger you might want to look at. I centered my attention on the Ladda and the Storhogen charger because they are the kind of products I use.

The brand new Lumu app does it all

The brand new Lumu app

With the introduction, soon, of the Lumu Power, which offers light, exposure, flash and color temperature meter in one device, Lumu felt the need to redesign their app, so a new Lumu app is going to be released shortly before the Lumu Power launch.

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The Lumu Power is about to become a reality thanks to 1705 backers on Kickstarter. Presented as a light meter for the future, it will be available in August, with a price of $229. The Lumu Power is announced as the lightmeter to rule them all and it really appears to be. Until now you needed to use multiple tools to measure light. Lumu Power does all that in a single device.

The brand new Lumu appThe brand new Lumu app
When the creators of the device set off to build a completely new Lumu, they wanted it to replace the chunky old way of doing things. By making the Lumu Power for the iPhone, they replaced a huge device with a tiny one. With the new device came the idea for a single app that would make it all too. That’s how the new app was designed. According to the creators of the Lumu, the new app “is made to be a tool that helps you do your best work. It does not want attention, it does not want to stand in the way. It is not an object of admiration. It doesn’t have a lot of features. It doesn’t need them.”

The brand new Lumu app

The new app, from what the first images show, has less clutter on the screen, making it a streamlined tool that gives you the essential information you need, without unnecessary baggage. The creators say that they “got rid of it, so you can focus on that one information you actually need, yet access everything else with minimum number of strokes.”

If you want to know more about the new Lumu app or even try a beta app, visit Lumu’s page on the web.

SmallHD vs Sony vs Panasonic

SmallHD vs Sony vs Panasonic

SmallHD may have convinced a lot of people about the build quality of their monitors, when, recently, they put their new HDR production monitors through a harsh beating test. But now the test is different: can the 1703 HDR beat the Panasonic BTLH1700HD and the Sony PVM-A170?

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The first real-world test of the SmalHD new HDR production monitors had not much to do with production itself. Their torture test, which is shown in a 2.30 minutes video at the end of this page, put the monitors against baseball bats, off-road vehicles, .40 caliber handguns and more. Why? Because, as Wes Phillips, SmallHD co-founder, “downtime can be a very expensive side-effect of a monitor built without durability in mind, so we took it upon ourselves to prove that these are the toughest monitors on the market.”

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The test demonstrated, continues Wes Phillips, that “these are unbelievably rugged production monitors, and the same level of build quality is demonstrated in every model.” Now, SmallHD set up another real world test, one where the 1703 HDR faces industry standard monitors such as the Panasonic BTLH1700HD and the Sony PVM-A170.

The video has a goal: show that the 1703 HDR solves real, on set problems. Take your time to watch it and form your own opinion. Then go and read the whole article “How does the SmallHD 1703 HDR compare to the Panasonic and Sony 17-inch production monitors?”

Hasselblad X1D as a video machine

Hasselblad X1D as a video machine

The promised “game changer” from Hasselblad may not be the camera most of us will buy, but it surely is an object of desire after the Stellar, Lunar and Lusso, considered “worst camera of the year” three years in a row. Now the Swedish camera company seems back on track to deliver real cameras for photographers. The X1D is, when it comes to video, a Full HD machine, which is probably enough for its market.

Weighing less than half that of a conventional digital medium format camera, at just 725g, the Hasselblad X1D gets inspiration from the brand’s design heritage, revealing it in a mirrorless camera, the first in medium format, which is both ergonomic and compact, offering a handling experience unlike any other… and that I would like very much to put to test, so as to compare it with my old Fujifilm 645.

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Commenting on the announcement Perry Oosting, Hasselblad CEO, noted: “The X1D marks a pivotal point in Hasselblad’s rich 75-year history. This camera makes medium format photography available to a new generation of Hasselblad users, while pushing the existing limits of photography to new heights.”

One has to agree with Oosting’s comments. Hasselblad has ingeniously introduced mirrorless technology to digital medium format for the first time ever, creating a precision performance camera that can rest in the palm of your hand. The 50MP CMOS sensor delivering up to 14 stops of dynamic range captures the finest details with true natural colours.

Hasselblad X1D as a video machine

This CMOS sensor, which offers 8272 x 6200 pixels, will probably be used for some unique time-lapse sequences that will explore both the camera’s ability to expose from 60 minutes to 1/2000th sec. with full flash synchronisation throughout the range, and the completely new family of dedicated autofocus lenses, XCD, which has been developed to support optical quality and portability. At launch two lenses with integral central shutter are available: 45mm and 90mm. The camera is also compatible with all 12 lenses and lens accessories from the Hasselblad professional H System, through an adapter.

The X1D’s high-resolution rear LCD offers touch control for all aspects of the camera’s features. The icon-based user interface speeds access to customisation options along with intuitive playback functions such as swipe and pinch to zoom, but the camera also boasts an XGA electronic viewfinder for bright, crisp viewing even under difficult lighting conditions.

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With Wi-Fi, built-in GPS, a flash hot-shoe for Nikon flashes, ISO range from 100 to 25,600, Dual SD card slots, USB 3.0 Type-C connector, Mini HDMI, Audio In/Out, the Hasselblad XD1 seems ready to be a trusted partner and ideal travel companion for passionate photographers who also want to be able to explore moving images. There are limitations when it comes to video, as there is only 1920×1080 available – H.264 Compressed (25 fps) – but imagine the results achievable with a portable system offering the narrow depth-of-field associated with medium format cameras: an unrivaled look and bokeh in your footage. And the X1D has connectors for microphone and headphones!

All this fits in the palm of your hand, if you’ve the 7,900 EUR / 8,995 USD / 5,990 GBP asked, all prices stated exclusive of VAT. It does not matter if you’ve the money for it or not, the Hasselblad X1D is, probably, one of the best moves from Hasselblad in a long time, and a bold way to celebrate Hasselblad’s return to its senses.